What’s your race plan?

What’s your race plan?

Sep 29, 2013

An Introduction to Ultra-cycling Team racing Strategy (4-6-8 rider teams) Developing a logical, safe and efficient race plan is an essential element of competing in an ultra-endurance cycling event. To create your race plan, you need to evaluate your strengths and weaknesses and do your best to maximize your strengths while minimizing the later. Serious consideration and planning are critical to developing a race plan that allows your team’s best efforts to become realized. Elements to be considered: 1)     Objective – what do you hope to accomplish? 2)     Safety – nobody wins or accomplishes anything when safety is compromised. 3)     Resources – can your funds and support crew support your plan? 4)     Adaptability – lots of race plans look great on paper, but things change quickly out on a course so be prepared to adapt. 5)     Experience – whether you have it or not, find ways to acquire it before you race. To read the rest of this article, please follow this...

A Vertical Century.

A Vertical Century.

Sep 21, 2013

A Vertical Century? Our Tour of British Columbia route/map maker, Ron Penner, sent us a map today which combined all three of our routes and my head starting spinning about a vertical century.  It wasn’t the distance that surprised me, I mean that is simple to deduce but it seems my brain blocked out calculating the total climbing which comes in at 129,000 meters or 130 kilometers or 80 miles “up”. Please visit http://goo.gl/1uhc30 Once I chewed on that for a moment I begin to think about a vertical century. In all my days of cycling I have never heard of anyone speaking about completing or even attempting a vertical century. If you have rode a vertical century or know someone who has, we loved to hear about it? Or maybe you’re up for the challenge?  If someone rode all three of our routes they would complete well over a metric vertical century but if someone rode the BC Explorer and the Tour of BC Routes they would ride just over a vertical century along with 7,947 kilometers of distance. The distance may be enough to rattle the confidence of most people but not everyone I am sure. I rode 14,300 kilometers 3 times so if you look at it that way, it is definitely doable: a vertical century. A vertical century would put you into outer space which according to the thinkers at NASA begins at the 81 kilometer mark. A vertical century is a serious challenge and if you just want to work up to it we suggest you ride one our three races, the BC Contender, the BC Explorer or the Tour of British Columbia. If you are ready to give a full vertical metric century a go, just register for the Tour of BC and the BC Explorer and will keep the courses open for you and cheer you on at the end. The beer is on us! BC Contender: 1,619 kilometers + 27,212 meters of climbing BC Explorer: 2,820 kilometers + 39,116 meters of climbing Tour of British Columbia:  5,145 kilometers + 64,284 meters of climbing  ...

Selecting your Race?

Selecting your Race?

Aug 26, 2013

We put together a brief page, with a comparison chart outlining the differences between our three ultra-cycling races. Just remember that they all start August 3rd, 2014 in White Rock, British Columbia. If you need help choosing an event or just have some questions just email us and we will get back to right away. Selecting your challenge can be tricky because you want to challenge yourself but you don’t want to take on something that you are not ready for. Fortunately, with 3 races of varying distances with 3 separate levels of accomplishment and the option of racing as a soloist or part of a relay team, there is truly a challenge for everyone. Please take a look at our comparison page and view the whole site. http://2014.tourdebc.com/quick-race-comparisons/...

Ultra Stage Racing?

Ultra Stage Racing?

Jun 18, 2012

Can the Tour of British Columbia be contested as a Stage Race? The Tour of British Columbia is an ultra-endurance cycling race but within its ‘ultra-structure’ riders may opt to follow a stage-to-stage style of racing. Riders who are interested in doing so must clearly keep in mind that there are two key elements involved that do differ from traditional stage-racing. The first is flexibility – if a racer decided to rest before the end of a stage they have that option available to them and secondly the official timing clock never stops running, each racer and their crew decide how long they rest at the end of each stage before beginning the next. To illustrate this point Ultraletic Sports created a preliminary series of stages for the Tour of British Columbia. To continue reading please click here ANY WAY YOU WANT TO RIDE...