LIVE RACE BLOG

First TourdeBC Champion

Posted by on Aug 13, 2014

News Release August 13th, 2014 (Vancouver, BC) Perry Stone, President, Ride Canada, Race Director Tour of British Columbia announces the completion of the first inaugural 5,200 kilometers Canadian ultra-endurance bicycle race the Tour of British Columbia held August 3rd to August 13th, 2014. Presented as the roughest, toughest , longest and most beautiful ultra-endurance bicycle race on earth the Tour of British Columbia is 5,147 kilometers long with nearly 54,000 meters of climbing. Competitors must compete 24 hours a day and with no stages or rests incorporated into the challenge. The 2014 Tour of British Columbia was won by Alessandro Colo of Italy. The veteran Italian ultra-marathon cyclist , 53 year old spin instructor from Rome, Italy  won the first ever race in a time of  9 days 16, hours and 46 minutes.  Colò who has competed in the race across America 4 times, and who has  numerous appearances in the Furnace Creek 508, The Fireweed and the Race Across Oregon and several European races was the sole competitor. Contacted by Perry Stone, Colò was advised of the situation in advance...

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Ultra Endurance Racing

The Explorer Route

Posted by on May 14, 2013

Cyclists be warned: The BC Explorer route has a pretty face as it travels around British Columbia and Alberta’s, Banff and Jasper but it is TOUGH! Be prepared. The map below provides a general overview only. Some of the communities visited are: White Rock, Hope, Princeton, Grand Forks, Salmo, Creston, Cranbrook, Fernie, Sparwood, Canmore, Banff, Jasper, Houston, Burns Lake, Fraser Lake, Vanderhoof, Prince George, Quesnel, Williams Lake, 100 Mile House, Clinton, Lillooet, Pemberton, Whistler, Squamish, Vancouver. To view a route map, please click...

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Race Strategy +

What’s your race plan?

Posted by on Sep 29, 2013

An Introduction to Ultra-cycling Team racing Strategy (4-6-8 rider teams) Developing a logical, safe and efficient race plan is an essential element of competing in an ultra-endurance cycling event. To create your race plan, you need to evaluate your strengths and weaknesses and do your best to maximize your strengths while minimizing the later. Serious consideration and planning are critical to developing a race plan that allows your team’s best efforts to become realized. Elements to be considered: 1)     Objective – what do you hope to accomplish? 2)     Safety – nobody wins or accomplishes anything when safety is compromised. 3)     Resources – can your funds and support crew support your plan? 4)     Adaptability – lots of race plans look great on paper, but things change quickly out on a course so be prepared to adapt. 5)     Experience – whether you have it or not, find ways to acquire it before you race. To read the rest of this article, please follow this...

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Director's Cut

Biking BAD

Posted by on Oct 4, 2013

Biking BAD – An open letter to Lance Armstrong. (Originally published on the Daily Peloton) Mr. Lance Armstrong. When I think about Walter White the much maligned and loved, one time, fictitious cancer survivor who hides his relationship with drugs from the public I can’t help but think of you. In the amazingly popular Vince Gilligan TV series ‘Breaking Bad” Walter White’s actions caused the deaths of countless people and destroyed people’s lives on two continents yet for the most part the public loved Walter right to the end. Back on planet earth the many of the people who once lined up to praise you, Lance Armstrong, now salivate and rub their hands hoping for you to lose the empire you built with hard work, deception and drugs. The same Lance Armstrong who helped millions of people afflicted with cancer by educating them and showing them that cancer can be beaten. In the arts and in real life the number of anti-heroes who people cheer for seems to continually grow; Bonnie and Clyde, Al Capone, Jesse James, Jesse Pinkman, Dick Cheney,...

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Recent Posts

South to Alaska

I fear that I may never catch up if I try to report on yesterday, so for now a brief summary. The highlights of the day were headwinds, massive road maintenance delays and unpaved ground, a loss of cell service and wife and one agitated ultra-endurance rider named Colo. I don’t want to bash the guy as I appreciate the massive stress he is under and the strain on his body and the diminishing faculties that I like to call rider brain. It happened, he recovered we recovered and on went the Colò road show. Again I say it: impressive. Overnight he fought his way along the Alaska Highway visiting nowhere, seeing nothing just riding like a bat out of hell. In the morning he continued on  towards Watson Lake in the Yukon. This is a major point in our race because of two things. First it is as far north as we go and after about a 35 k westerly jag, we turned south to Alaska (see image) Smithers, Prince George, Whistler and the finish line on the pier in White Rock, BC some 2,100 kilometers away. The Stewart Cassiar Highway is nearly paradise for cyclist but the road grade can be rough as in a the seal coat and the road is narrow but the scenery and rate of traffic more than makes up for it. And I have to figure Alessandro is entirely business now, he pulled in about 60 k down the road and went to work cleaning his change. I thought his procedure was a little excessive but the fact is the man has ridden over 3,000 kilometers in 6 days and I have to figure that the man knows what he is doing. When he was ready to roll again I wished him luck and told him to watch out for crocodiles, he replied” Thank you very much”. I told you he is focused. I got evicted from the escort car earlier and now I am riding in the advance vehicle with Daniela and Laura. Fortunately Laura was in a talkative mode which helps keep me awake and more alert. Daniela rode in the back rested and read...

North to Alaska Day 5

After leaving Grande Prairie yesterday morning and learning of Chris Culos and David Baxter’s incredible rides in the PowerCranks Contender and the Naked Challenger I started to really think about what Alessandro is accomplishing ( so far) and it added some shock to my system. I like to be honest, so here goes: When I met Alessandro at his hotel a day prior to starting the Tour of BC and he handed me his race plan to finish in 12 days I thought “ambitious” and I thought good I don’t want this to drag on but I really didn’t expect him to be able to pull it off as I was thinking 14 or 15 days. Now as I sit in the rain swept Fort Nelson 450 kilometers along the Alaska Highway I have seen him deal with mucho problems and challenges. The climbing, the climbing in intense heat, the descents in the cold of night, the pain in his legs and buttocks, working to sync his crew, brutal headwinds, some stressful traffic at times and now about 16 hours of rain and I got to start thinking this man from Italy is the real deal. That this man, the lone person in the entire world brave enough to race this race might just be having the race of a lifetime. Sure he gets grumpy and withdrawn in moments; anyone would, but the man bounces back like a basketball and almost always smiles. I see him playing electrician to get his flashing lights on escort vehicle working better, cleaning his own chain, even getting food for others, the man is on a mission and he is not allowing the pressure, pain or conditions to get in his way. When I woke on the side of the road in the advance vehicle there was no sky – only clouds and rain at daybreak and I felt for the man, but an hour or so passed as doubt built and boom then he was there. He didn’t stop to talk, he didn’t even acknowledge us. Simple, pure, old-fashioned focus. I hopped in the follow car with his daughter Laura who might be getting sick of me...

DAY FOUR

Highlights from Day 4 Still no bear sightings but plenty to look at on the road as we traveled through Banff and Jasper towards Hinton we experienced a million sights and sensations. There isn’t a camera made or a writer talented enough to describe the beauty that surrounded us. I head at least 100 times “mama mia, bellisimo and mucho bravo, to what I can add Canada. Currently I am sitting in our truck outside a gas station in Grande Prairie, Alberta where we slept and waited for Alessandro and his two handlers. No one can explain the miracles that Daniela is able to create working with Alessandro’s legs and buttocks, she is the leg whisperer. Time after time Alessandro gets off the bike in pain (but smiling) and Daniela rebuilds him. (A talent she apparently reserves for him exclusively for when I asked for assistance she responded with an international symbol made with one finger) On the outskirts of Japer, on the side of Highway 16 she rebuilt him, then 60 kilometers later where we turned north on the scenic route to Alaska she fixed him again; this time as a thunder shower helped clean his body. Then another 80 kilometers down the road where he was up to what I will call “ultra-rider things” like refusing to stop, throwing his water bottle on the road for us to collect, then stopping instantly in a dangerous spot and demanding food, clothes and therapy he finally stopped for his longest rest of the trip so far, a walloping 2.5 hours. He lunged into our follow car and ripped the food from my fingers which I could care less about but his sweating, grimy shoulder touched mine and if I had a gun the race would have been over. Ha-ha. I got out of the vehicle ‘toot sweet’ and so did most of our gear. We have a tiny follow car called a Chevy Spark, which is fantastic. It is small, can fit in the highway shoulder and is great on fuel but for sleeping not so great. No matter within minutes Alessandro is naked and bent like a pretzel and Daniela  has begun to...

BAXTER 30 MILES TO GO!

Just go an update from David Baxter, he has 30 miles to...

Culos approaching Vancouver!

Chris Culos is almost to Vancouver! Go Chris...

CULOS

Chris just checked in around 8:00 am and has given an arrival time of around 2:00 this...